Tag Archives: class action

Andrew Todd Yocum Loss Recovery

Investors of Andrew Todd Yocum may be entitled to recovery of their losses.  Mr. Yocum is a former broker of Morgan Stanley and Summit Brokerage.  He has entered into regulatory settlements with both the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) and Florida regulators.   If you have suffered investment losses as a result of investing with Yocum please call 1-866-817-0201 for a free and confidential consultation with a private attorney.

In 2015, FINRA, the national regulatory agency that oversees securities brokers and brokerages, commenced an investigation into Yocum.  It alleged the he effected unauthorized securities transactions, exercised discretion over portfolios without written authorization, and recommended unsuitable concentrated purchases of energy sector securities to senior investors.

Unsuitable investments are investments that are either too risky or otherwise do not fit the investor’s profile.  Such investments generally enrich the broker at the expense of the investor.

Yocum did not contest the charge by FINRA. Ultimately, FINRA barred him from practicing as a securities broker.

On May 4, 2017, Yocum was found by Florida regulators to have committed similar offenses.  Those offenses being the failure to get appropriate authorization from his clients and the recommendation of unsuitable securities.  Yocum neither admitted, nor did he deny, the findings.

Yocum entered the securities industry in September 2002 when he became associated with a FINRA member firm.  All securities brokerage firms in the United States must be members of FINRA.  FINRA is a self-regulatory organization that the Securities and Exchange Commission has empowered to oversee securities brokerages.

The former employers of Yocum have been sued over 30 times for their failure to supervise the portfolios of investors and ensure protection from the securities violations described above.

Yocum first became registered with FINRA through that firm on November 28,2002. YocumNYSE pic 1 remained registered with FINRA through an association with two member firms between 2002 and 2009.  Neither of these firm from that time period were identified in the FINRA investigation.

On June 1, 2009, Yocum became a broker with Morgan Stanley. On October 6, 2015, Morgan Stanley filed a Uniform Termination Notice for Securities Industry Registration. The reason for Yocum’s termination from Morgan Stanley was listed as “[a]llegations concerning acting on verbal discretion.”

Subsequent to his termination with Morgan Stanley, Yocum became affiliated with Summit.  On March 3, 2016, that firm filed a Form with FINRA noticing the regulator that it was terminating Yocum’s association as of March 1, 2016. Since March 1, 2016, Yocum did not re-associate with another FINRA member firm.

Please call the number above to speak to an attorney who handles investment disputes against brokerages such as Morgan Stanley and brokers such as Yocum.

GPB Loss Recovery

Investors of GPB or any GPB Capital investments, please call 1-866-817-0201 about potential loss recovery.  Initial consultations are free and confidential.  Jeffrey Pederson is a private attorney who has successfully represented investors nationwide in obtaining settlements or judgments for investment losses.

Information exists to support that GPB Capital was inappropriately sold by independent brokerage firms across the country.  These investments are now illiquid and essentially worthless.  These brokerages are liable for the losses of their investors.

Brokerages have duties to investors in the sale of investments such as GPB.  These investments were high-risk, and brokerage were only allowed to recommend the investments to

On August 17, 2018, the firm halted sales to review accounting.  The purported reason was to “integrate the high volume of recent acquisitions.”

On August 24, 2018, GPB announced that the fund will restate its 2015 and 2016 financial statements.  The adjustments were due to errors in income and the source of such income that came to light in audits done on the investments.

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Many GPB investors thought they were getting a safe investment.

On September 12, 2018, Massachusetts top securities regulator William Galvin started an investigation into the sales practices of independent stock brokerage firms in connection with the recommending of investments in GPB Capital Holdings.

GPB investments were always known to be very high risk.  As such, the investments were not suitable for a large portion of the investing public.  Brokers have a legal obligation to only recommend suitable investments.   The motivation for selling such risky investments to moderate investors is likely the result of the excessive commissions that were paid the brokers for such sales – commissions much higher than would be paid for the sale of suitable investments.

The Massachusetts Securities Division has information about one independent stock brokerage firm’s sales practices in connection with GPB sales, coming in the wake of GPB’s announcement that GPB has temporarily stopped bringing in new funds.  It has also suspended redemptions while it concentrates on accounting and financial reporting.

In addition, there is an issue with the failure to file financials.  Such a failure should have been discovered by any brokerage firm selling the investments and should have been a red flag of the extreme risk in the recommendation of the investments.  Two private GBP investments that are required because of their size to file financial statements with the Securities and Exchange Commission failed to meet filing deadlines.

These matters have led to a sweep by regulators of 63 broker-dealers that sell GPB, with the regulators requesting data on the extent of sales activity in Massachusetts, disclosure and marketing documents that the firms provide to investors on the solicitations and data on investor suitability.

“While my Securities Division’s investigation is in the very nascent stages, recent activity within GPB raises red flags of potential problems. These red flags, coupled with the fact that sales of private placements by independent broker-dealers have been an ongoing source of investor harm, have led to this investigation,” Galvin, the lead regulator, stated.

Galvin goes on to state, “I must also express my serious concerns regarding the expected proposal by the SEC to expand who can participate in private securities offerings. Without a strong fiduciary rule to prevent sales practice abuses, it is utter folly not to know that main street investors will be hurt.”

Stephen Hurtuk investors

Please call 1-866-817-0201 if you were an investor of Stephen Hurtuk.  Mr. Hurtuk has recently surrendered his license instead of attempting to defend claims that he inappropriately recommended unsuitable investments to a significant number of his investors.  Hurtuk was previously with both Citigroup and Stifel, Nicolaus.

Invest photo 2On June 27, 2017, FINRA, the regulatory authority that oversees securities brokerages, sent a request to Hurtuk for on-the-record testimony. The request was sent in connection with FINRA’s investigation into potentially unsuitable recommendations by Hurtuk to eight customers, between May 2015 and September 2016. Instead of responding to the request, Hurtuk chose not to defend though the failure to defend would mean the revocation of his license.

An unsuitable investment is any investment that is not consistent with either the objectives, sophistication, or risk tolerance of an investor.  For example, a conservative investor reliant upon his or her savings who loses more than 15% of a portfolio in a year was likely sold an unsuitable investment.  This is because the risk of loss was greater than the investor was willing to assume.

The regulatory action only addressed 16 months during 2015 and 2016.  However, we believe offending investment recommendations extend beyond this period.  We are interested in those recommended unsuitable investments from 2011 onward.

Consistent with this, the employers of Mr Hurtuk, Stifel and Citigroup, have defended six filed or threatened legal suits concerning the unsuitable recommendations of Stephen Thomas Hurtuk.  These suits extend from 2007 through the present.  Five of these suits have settled.

His affiliation with Citigroup was in Canfield, Ohio and lasted from 2001 to 2007.  Stifel was his employer from 2007 until 2017 and he operated out of Boardman, Ohio.

We help investors such as the victims of Mr. Hurtuk.  Cases are generally handled on a contingency basis, where attorney fees are paid by a percentage of the settlement or judgment obtained.  Cases against securities brokerages are subject to binding arbitration through FINRA.  Jeffrey Pederson has handled such arbitration cases across the country.   Please call for a free and confidential consultation and see if your losses are recoverable.

Investors of Charla Kabana

Investors of Charla Kabana, previously of Sagepoint and LPL Financial, and currently of Kabana Financial in California, please call 1-866-817-0201 for a free and confidential consultation.

Wall Street photo 2On August 21, 2018, Charla Kabana finalized a settlement agreement with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA).   Conditions include barring her from serving as a securities broker.  FINRA sought to investigate questionable variable annuity sales and other issues of Kabana.

Kabana refused to cooperate with FINRA, despite licensing requirements to the contrary.  The consequence of the failure to provide information in the investigation was the loss of her securities license.

The FINRA regulatory action came about due to the termination of Kabana by LPL.  LPL investigated Kabana and ultimately  terminated Kabana on July 11, 2016 due to “[c]oncerns regarding [Kabana's] practices in respect to variable annuity business and related responses to Compliance.”

She subsequently was able to serve as a representative of Sagepoint Financial until losing her license in August 2018.

FINRA requested financial documents and testimony on the record.  The focus being the LPLreasons for the LPL termination and the alleged irregularities in the securities sales.  Kabana refused to do so.

The record of Kabana, known as her CRD, also shows other disclosure events which should serve as a “red flag” for employers and other supervisors.  This creates potential liability for those employers and supervisors for the losses incurred by investors.

Attention Investors of John Maccoll

John C. Maccoll, who was a registered representative of UBS Financial Services and an investment advisor, is charged both criminally and civilly with defrauding at least 15 of his brokerage clients, most of them elderly and retired, in a scheme that lasted for at least a decade.  If you were an investor with Maccoll please call 1-866-817-0201 for a free and confidential consultation.  Representation will be on a contingency fee basis.

Maccoll’s career goes back 40 years.  Prior to being with UBS he spent years working as a brokerguy in handcuffs for Morgan Stanley.  We believe that he used his scheme not only at UBS but also at Morgan Stanley.

According to the SEC, he used high-pressure sales tactics to convince his brokerage customers to invest in what he described as a “highly sought after” private fund investment. The victims were convinced to sell their retirement accounts or borrow against them and make out checks to Maccoll.

The actions of Macoll are commonly referred to as “selling away.”  This is common.  A broker will either try to sell an investment of a confidant who will pay him a premium, or sometimes make up the investment completely.  Brokerage firms are required to have mechanisms in place to detect and stop such trading practices.

One customer’ defrauded invested her life savings and money from her deceased husband’s life insurance payout, which she intended to use to pay for college expenses for her three children, adding that Maccoll knew that the funds invested in his customers’ accounts were for retirement or college expenses.

Charles Bloom of Chelsea Financial

Please call 1-866-817-0201 if you were an investor with Charles Bloom of Chelsea Financial.  Bloom operated primarily in the West Palm and Royal Palm areas of Florida, but likely has investors nationwide.  We have reason to believe that Bloom engaged in a pattern of inappropriate behavior in the portfolios of his investors.

In October 2017, FINRA, the regulator that oversees securities brokers, commenced an investigation into allegations that Bloom engaged in an unsuitable pattern of trading in at least three customer accounts.

All securities brokers are required to know their investors and only recommend investments Invest photo 2that are consistent, or suitable, with the investors risk tolerance and investment objectives, among other things.  Brokers have many incentives to recommend investments that are too risky or otherwise unsuitable for investors.  This motivation can lead to large losses by an investor.  As such, the recommendation of unsuitable investments is considered to be a form of fraud.

In connection with the FINRA investigation, on June 21, 2018, FINRA sent a request to Bloom for on-the-record testimony. Brokers are required to cooperate with FINRA investigations into misconduct.  As stated in a phone call with FINRA staff on July 3, 2018, Bloom acknowledges that he received FINRA’s request and would not cooperate.

Ultimately, Bloom surrendered his license and accepted a bar from the securities industry as a result of the allegation.  However, this allegation is just the latest in a long list of allegations.  The record  of Bloom shows prior regulatory actions, a 20-day suspension, and two customer suits.  This raises the question of why Bloom was hired and why he was not given appropriate supervision in light of his history.

We represent investors in securities industry arbitration proceedings across the country.  Please call for a free and confidential consultation.

 

Attention Kenny Kim, IFG Investors

If you were an investor of Kyusun “Kenny” Kim of IFG, please call 1-866-817-0201 to speak to an attorney about your rights for recovery.  Most cases are handled on a contingency basis, where the attorney does not receive fees unless there is a recovery.

Mr. Kim has been accused, and ultimately barred from the securities industry, by regulators  for systematically committing securities violations in the accounts of senior investors for the time period of 2006 through 2015.  He is accused of both of recommending unreasonably risky, or unsuitable investments, to senior investors, and of falsifying the documents of the investors to allow him to convey to his supervisors that the recommendations were suitable.

Invest photo 2As a broker, Mr. Kim’s actions are governed by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA).  FINRA has a suitability rule that requires that a broker have a reasonable basis for believing that a recommended transaction or investment strategy is suitable for the customer based on the customer’s investment profile, which includes, among other factors,
the customer’s age, financial situation and needs, investment experience, and risk
tolerance.

Kim was selling alternative investments to seniors.  Alternative investments are investment other than stocks, bonds and mutual funds.  They include REITs that do not trade on a stock exchange and structured notes.  Though structured notes may look like bonds or mutual funds, such investments contain a derivative component that make the investment extremely risky and speculative in nature.  An investor may need to speak to an attorney just to confirm an investment is actually a structured note.  Such recommendations were improper for investors with conservative or moderate risk tolerances.

Adding to the risk, Kim improperly recommended that many of the investors unreasonably concentrate their portfolios in these alternative investments.  This only increased the level of speculation in the portfolio.

This is only the latest chapter in a long history of regulatory actions and customer lawsuits.  FINRA has indentified 23 investor lawsuits, either filed or threatened, concerning Kim.

While Mr. Kim has been expelled from the securities industry, this does little to compensate investors who have lost their life savings.  Jeffrey Pederson has represented investors across the country in similar suits in front of FINRA.  Please call for a free and confidential consultation.

 

Eric Sampson Loss Recovery

We have filed suit and we are actively pursuing actions to recover losses incurred by victims of Eric Sampson.  Victims are primarily investors of Sampson’s My Investment Advisor (“My IA”).  If you are a victim, please call 1-866-817-0201 for a free and confidential initial consultation.

Sampson operated at different times out of St. George, UT, Washington, UT, Greenwood Village, CO and Colorado Springs, CO.  Investments sold by Sampson that are considered fraudulent include Golden Assets, LLC, Shooks Run, LLC, The Hills at Santa Clara, and Wright Indoor Comfort.

At all relevant times, Sampson was a licensed securities broker, working first for Girard Stock handcuffsSecurties and subsequently World Choice Securities.  The practice of Sampson was a hybrid brokerage investment advisory practice that he controlled and that was made aware to his employers.  In such a situation, the investment advisory is required by pay the brokerage for supervision.  The brokerage, in turn, is charged with ensuring that the advisory is not selling investments fraudulently.

Federal criminal charges are currently pending against Sampson.  There is also currently a case against Sampson and My IA by Utah regulators.

As stated in the Federal criminal action, “It was the object of [Sampson's] scheme and artifice to defraud for defendant Sampson to fraudulently obtain money from his MY IA clients through false statements, misrepresentations, deception, fraudulent conduct, and omissions of material facts, and thereafter cause the money to be diverted for defendant SAMPSON’s personal use and benefit.”

Recovering Woodbridge Losses of Peter Holler

If you were an investor with Peter Holler and invested in Woodbridge notes, please call 1-866-817-0201 about options to recover losses.

We believe Holler and his employer have the bulk of responsibility for these losses.  During the relevant period when Holler sold Woodbridge, which coincides with his time working for Securities Services Network (SSN), Holler solicited investors to purchase promissory notes in Woodbridge Mortgage Investment Funds, a purported real-estate investment fund. Ultimately, Holler sold approximately $1.39 million in Woodbridge notes to 19 individuals, nine of whom were SSN customers. He received $49,790 in commission in connection with these transactions.

Woodbridge has been identified as a $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC ).  The allegations are that Woodbridge gave notes to investors for funds to be used as hard money loans to be used in the development of real property.  Instead the funds were co-mingled by Woodbridge and used to pay earlier investors.   Woodbridge became insolvent shortly after the SEC brought its action.

LandmarkRecovery from the Woodbridge bankruptcy may be difficult.  Woodbridge and its subsidiaries are in bankruptcy proceedings in federal court in Delaware.  The Woodbridge notes were largely unsecured despite assertions to the contrary by those soliciting the notes.  As a general rule, bankruptcy are where unsolicited claims are extinguished.  Holler and SSN had a duty to know these facts prior to investing an investors and disclosing to the investors this incredibly high risk of loss.

These Woodbridge investments were not properly reported to his employer and his employer either turned a blind eye or failed to do the requisite supervision to monitor against such outside business activity.  As a result, the investments were sold though they were not suitable to be sold to any investor.  This creates potential liability on the part of both Holler and SSN.

The regulator FINRA brought an action against Holler for his sale of Woodbridge.  This regulatory action echos the concern that the Woodbridge investments and their sale were not appropriately vetted.

FINRA rules state, “prior to participating in a private securities transaction, [a broker] shall provide written notice to the member with which he is associated describing in detail the proposed transaction and the person’s proposed role therein and stating whether he has received or may receive selling compensation in connection with the transaction.” FINRA Rule 3280(e) defines a private securities transaction as any securities transaction outside the regular course or scope of an associated person’s employment with a member. FIN RA Rule 20 I 0 requires associated persons, in the conduct or their business, to observe high standards of commercial honor and just and equitable principles of trade.

The record  of Holler indicates that he and his former employer, Securities Services Network, currently facing two investor suits over the sale of Woodbridge notes.   Both suits suits were filed subsequent to the bankruptcy of Woodbridge in December 2017.

Securities Services Network previously terminated Holler in August 2017 for the sale of Woodbridge notes.  BrokerCheck identifies that Holler was terminated because the Woodbridge sales were unapproved by the firm.  Despite this, Securities Services Network

We represent a number of investors across the country in obtaining recovery of Woodbridge losses.  Please call for a free consultation.

 

 

Fifth Third Annuity Fraud

If you were recommended the purchase or sale of an annuity by Fifth Third you may have been the victim of fraud.  We represent investors nationwide and are available to discuss whether you are a victim and entitled to compensation.  Please call 1-866-817-0201 for a free and confidential consultation.

Invest photo 2The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) in a statement on May 8, 2018 stated that it has fined Fifth Third Securities $4 million and required the firm to pay approximately $2 million in restitution to customers for failure to accurately consider and describe costs and benefits of variable annuity (VA) exchanges, and for recommending exchanges without a reasonable basis to believe they were suitable for customers.  While the FINRA action focused on variable annuities, the exchange or early liquidation of any annuity is possibly a violation.

Variable annuities are complex and expensive investments commonly marketed and sold to retirees or those saving for retirement. Exchanging one annuity with another involves a comparison of the complex features of each security. Accordingly, annuity exchanges are subject to regulatory requirements to ensure that brokers have a reasonable basis to recommend them, and their supervisors have a reasonable basis to approve the sales.  Failure to do so can cost investors hundreds of thousands of dollars and cause the investor savings to become unnecessarily illiquid.

Brokerage firms, like Fifth Third, have been on notice of this problem and other problems with annuities for years.  FINRA has warned of the limited suitability of these investments and that they should only be sold to limited types of investors and has done so more than once..  In fact, variable annuities and variable life insurance is so prone to fraud, FINRA has specific rules concerning these products.

FINRA found that Fifth Third failed to ensure that its registered representatives obtained and assessed accurate information concerning the recommended annuity exchanges. It also found that the firm’s registered representatives and principals were not adequately trained on how to conduct a comparative analysis and truthfully sell the annuities.

As a result, the firm misstated the costs and benefits of exchanges, making the exchange appear more beneficial to the customer. By reviewing a sample of annuity exchanges that the firm approved from 2013 through 2015, FINRA found that Fifth Third misstated or omitted facts relating to the costs or benefits of the annuity recommendation or exchange in approximately 77 percent of the sample.  For example:

  • Fifth Third overstated the total fees of the existing VA or misstated fees associated with various additional optional benefits, known as riders.
  • Fifth Third failed to disclose that the existing VA had an accrued living benefit value, or understated the living benefit value, which the customer would forfeit upon executing the proposed exchange.
  • Fifth Third represented that a proposed VA had a living benefit rider even though the proposed VA did not, in fact, include a living benefit rider.

FINRA found that the firm’s principals ultimately approved approximately 92 percent of VA exchange applications submitted to them for review. However, in light of the firm’s supervisory deficiencies, the firm did not have a reasonable basis to recommend and approve many of these transactions.

In addition, FINRA found that Fifth Third failed to comply with a term of its 2009 settlement with FINRA. In the 2009 action, FINRA found that, from 2004 to 2006, Fifth Third effected 250 unsuitable annuity exchanges and transactions and had inadequate systems and procedures governing its annuity exchange business. For more than four years following the settlement, the firm failed to fully implement an independent consultant’s recommendation that it develop certain surveillance procedures to monitor VA exchanges by individual registered representatives.

As a result, the firm misstated costs and benefits of VA exchanges — and in some cases omitted critical information altogether — making the exchanges appear more beneficial to customers in 77 percent of the exchanges Finra reviewed for the period of 2013 through 2015. For instance, Fifth Third transgressions included telling customers that the new VA contracts being marketed had living rider benefits guaranteeing minimum payments to customers and their beneficiary when none existed, Finra said.