Tag Archives: LPL

LPL Losses in Unregistered Securities

LPLLPL Financial will pay up to $26 million to settle charges that its representatives sold unregistered securities to clients over the past 12 years.  This includes the payment not only of a certain amount for certain unregistered securities, it also includes a payment of 3% simple interest on the investments.

The settlement covers a variety  of unregistered securities, including private placements and certain municipal bonds.  There are also certain stocks, corporate bonds and structured investments that may be covered.

Securities can only be legally sold to investors if the securities are either registered or qualify to be exempt from registration.  Otherwise, the sale is in violation of not only federal securities laws, but also state securities laws.

LPL agreed to the settlement after an investigation by the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA).  The NASAA found that its customers were sold unregistered and non-exempt securities since October 2006, according to an announcement.

LPL Financial, the largest U.S. independent broker-dealer by revenue, said it will pay a $499,000 fine to each of the 52 U.S. states and territories if they choose to participate in the deal. California has chosen not to participate, LPL said.

Investors will likely be faced with a decision on whether or not to enter into the agreement or pursue and action of their own.  We assist investors in the claim evaluation and assist investors to maximize their recoveries.

Charles Fackrell Fraud

If you were an investor with Charles Fackrell and believe you may be a victim of his fraud, or simply wish to know your rights, please call 1-866-817-0201 for a free consultation with an attorney.

LPLFackrell,  a former LPL adviser based in North Carolina, was sentenced by a federal court to more than five-years in prison for running a $1.4 million Ponzi scheme that operated under the name “Robin Hood.”

The former adviser pleaded guilty to one count of securities fraud in April and was sentenced last week to 63 months in jail.

From May 2012 to December 2014, Fackrell ran his Ponzi fraud, misusing funds from at least 20 investors. He was a registered broker with LPL during that time.

Fackrell “used his position of trust to solicit victim investors and steer them away from legitimate investments to purported investments with” various “Robin Hood” named entities, according to the U.S. Attorney’s office. “These were entities [Mr.] Fackrell controlled and through which he could access the victim’s funds.”

Promising guaranteed annual returns of 5% to 7%, Mr. Fackrell “solicited his victim investors by making false and fraudulent representations, including that the investors’ money would be invested in, or secured by, gold and other precious metals,” according to the U.S. attorney. In fact, Mr. Fackrell spent only a fraction of investor money on such assets, the government claims, and diverted over $700,000 back to his investors in the fashion of a Ponzi scheme.

He used the balance of the money to cover personal expenditures, including hotel expenses, groceries and medical bills, and to make purchases at various retail shops and to make large cash withdrawals.

Information for this post was found at investmentnews.com.

Paul Lebel of LPL

Paul Lebel, a broker formerly registered with LPL Financial, was barred on Tuesday, October 18, 2016, by the Securities and Exchange Commission for churning and excessively trading mutual funds in customer accounts and generating excess fees.  If you suffered losses with Mr. Lebel please call 1-866-817-0201 to speak to an attorney and receive a free consultation.

Mutual funds carry large loads which can be costly to investors if trading in and out of the funds.  These same loads can lead to substantial fees for a broker.  Brokers can defraud investors with only a few mutual fund trades.

Invest photo 2Lebel, who was with LPL broker from 2008 to 2014, “during his employment with LPL, [Lebel] defrauded four customers by churning several of their accounts,” according to the SEC which entered into a settlement with Mr. Lebel. “In particular, Lebel exercised de facto control over these customers’ accounts and excessively traded mutual fund shares which carry large front-end load fees.”

Mr. Lebel bought and sold mutual fund A shares, which are meant to be long-term, buy-and-hold investments, generating $50,000 in commissions, according to the SEC. Mr. Lebel will pay $56,500 as part of the settlement.

The SEC stated, “Lebel’s excessive trading was inconsistent with the customers’ investmentLPL objectives, and willfully disregarded the customers’ interest,”

We suspect that there are other investors who who have suffered loss as the result of fraud by Mr. Lebel.  We have help many investors recover their losses due to such action.  The amounts that we are seeking are separate and possibly in addition to the recovery by the SEC.

Losses at LPL Financial

LPLIf you have lost money with LPL you may be entitled to recovery of some or all of your losses.  Please call 1-866-817-0201 toll-free to speak to a lawyer for more information.

In May 2016, LPL broker Brian David Smit of Sioux Falls, South Dakota was barred from the securities industry.  This was pursuant to an agreement reached between Smit and FINRA regulators, an agreement referred to as an “AWC.”  The allegations concerned the sale of unapproved private securities.  His record also reflects that Smit was under investigation for such sale when he left LPL.  The sale of unapproved investments is a matter of concern since it is commonly a vehicle for fraud.

On May 6, 2015, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority Inc. (“FINRA”), ordered LPL Financial to pay $11.7 million in fines and restitution for what it deemed “widespread supervisory failures” related to sales of complex investment products.  Such products are suitable for only a limited portion of the investing public and FINRA prohibits the sale of such products to investors to whom such investments would not be suitable.

From 2007 to as recently as April 2015, LPL failed to properly supervise sales of certain complex investments, including certain exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), variable annuities and nontraded real estate investment trusts (“REITs”), and also failed to properly deliver more than 14 million trade confirmations to customers, according to the regulator.

LPL did not have a system in place to monitor the length of time customers held securities in their accounts or to enforce limits on concentrations of those complex products in customer accounts, FINRA said.  Such issues can lead to the sale of unsuitable investments and put such portfolios in a position of greater risk than the investor may have wanted or could afford to take.

The systems that LPL had in place to review trading activity in customer accounts were plagued by “multiple deficiencies,” Finra said. The firm failed to generate proper anti-money laundering alerts, for instance, and did not deliver trade confirmations in 67,000 customer accounts, according to the settlement letter.

The regulator also charged the firm for failing to supervise advertising and other communications, including brokers’ use of consolidated reports.

The penalty includes a $10 million fine and restitution of $1.7 million to customers who were sold certain exchange traded funds (“ETFs”). FINRA said the firm may pay additional compensation to ETF purchasers “pending a review of its ETF systems and procedures.”  As such, investors should speak to an attorney to maximize recovery of losses.

Content from this post from Investmentnews.com.