Tag Archives: theft

Demitrios Hallas investment loss

Hallas, a former stockbroker representative at a number of New York City broker-dealers, including PHX Financial, Santander, and Forefront Capital, is alleged by the SEC to have violated the multiple federal securities laws.  Investors should speak to a private attorney about their rights. We at PedersonLaw are currently investigating this matter.  Please call 1-866-817-0201.

The allegations contained in the SEC complaint are as follows:

First, Hallas is alleged to have purchased and sold daily leveraged Exchange-Traded Funds and Notes (ETFs and ETNs) in his customers’ accounts, knowingly or recklessly disregarding that these products were unsuitable for such customers.  Hallas had no reasonable basis for recommending daily leveraged ETFs and ETNs.  This constitutes a violation of the suitability requirement that a broker must only recommend investments that are suitable in light of an investors risk tolerance, objectives and that are within an investors level of sophistication.

Second, Hallas is alleged to have stolen funds from investors.  Under the guise of soliciting funds from one of his customers for investment purposes, misappropriated a total of $170,750 from that customer.

The products in which Hallas invested his customers’ hard-earned savings were daily leveraged ETFs and ETNs, and are characterized by a significant degree of volatility and risk. As alleged in the SEC complaint, these products were unsuitable, and Hallas had no reasonable basis for these recommendations.

ETFs are investment companies and ETNs are unsecured notes. Daily leveraged ETFs and ETNs seek to deliver a multiple, the inverse, or a multiple of the inverse of the performance of an underlying index or benchmark over the course of a single trading day. To accomplish their investment objectives, daily leveraged ETFs and ETNs pursue a range of investment strategies, though the strategies are mostly speculative, and only appropriate for investors willing to take the highest level of risk.

The strategies include swaps, futures contracts, and other derivative instruments. These products are inherently risky, complex and volatile, and are only appropriate for sophisticated, high-risk investors.

Unfortunately, Hallas’s customers were unsophisticated and not suitable for such investments. The investors had limited or no investing experience and their incomes, net worth levels, and assets were modest. “The risk and volatility in daily leveraged ETFs and ETNs was inconsistent with the investment profiles of Hallas’s customers, yet Hallas purchased and sold a total of 179 daily leveraged ETF and ETN positions in their accounts from September 2014 to October 2015.”

Hallas’s investors paid a total of approximately $128,000 in commissions and fees in connection with the purchase and sale of these 179 positions. The net loss across these 179 positions was approximately $150,000.

Hallas purchased and sold 22 different daily leveraged ETFs and ETNs in his customer accounts. These products sought to double or triple the performance, or the inverse of 2 Case 1:17-cv-02999 Document 1 Filed 04/25/17 Page 3 of 17 the performance, of over a dozen different underlying indices, including the S&P 500 VIX ShortTerm Futures Index, an investment based upon a volatility index, as well as certain gold mining, oil and gas and Russian, Chinese and Brazilian stock indices.

Finally, in a what the SEC has described as a “brazen and fraudulent scheme,” Hallas misappropriated $170,750 from an unsophisticated investor, who the SEC describes as “a truck driver with no trading or finance experience and no retirement resources outside of the funds that he provided to Hallas.”  The investor transferred funds to Hallas with the understanding that Hallas would make investments on his behalf; instead, Hallas spent Customer’s A’s funds on personal expenditures – a fact that he concealed from the investor.

A comprehensive article on the deeds of Mr. Hallas can be found in Investmentnews.com.

To speak to a private attorney about the recovery of losses with Mr. Hallas, call 1-866-817-0201 for a free and confidential initial consultation.

Anne Marie Comcowich Loss Recovery

Anne Marie Comcowich, a Scranton, Pennsylvania area securities broker, has agreed to a sanction to resolve a FINRA investigation.  The underlying investigation concerned the unauthorized withdraw of funds, theft, from investor accounts.  Ms. Comcowich was previously with Prudential.

In 2017, while being investigated in connection with unauthorized withdrawals, Comcowich, through her lawyer, informed FINRA staff that she would not produce information and documents requested pursuant to FINRA Rule 8210. Comcowich thereby violated FINRA Rules 8210 and 2010.

By failing to participate in the regulatory action, Comcowhich received a bar from FINRA which Bull pictureprohibits her from working with any other securities brokerage.

Details of the FINRA action can be found in its AWC.  In the AWC, Comcowich neither admits nor denies the allegations.

Comcowich was suspected of processing 13 unauthorized withdrawals from customer accounts. In an email and follow up telephone call with FINRA staff on April 3, 2017, and by this agreement, Comcowich acknowledges that she received FINRA’s requests and will not produce the information and documents requested.  The actions of Comcowich are in violation FINRA Rule 2010 provides that “[a] member in the conduct of its business shall observe high standards of commercial honor and just and equitable principles of trade.” A violation of FINRA Rule 8210 is also a violation of FINRA Rule 2010.

Jeffrey Pederson is an attorney who has represented investors similarly victimized.  A limited number of attorneys have such experience in front of FINRA, where such cases would need to be brought.  Please call for a free and confidential consultation.

 

Charles Fackrell Fraud

If you were an investor with Charles Fackrell and believe you may be a victim of his fraud, or simply wish to know your rights, please call 1-866-817-0201 for a free consultation with an attorney.

LPLFackrell,  a former LPL adviser based in North Carolina, was sentenced by a federal court to more than five-years in prison for running a $1.4 million Ponzi scheme that operated under the name “Robin Hood.”

The former adviser pleaded guilty to one count of securities fraud in April and was sentenced last week to 63 months in jail.

From May 2012 to December 2014, Fackrell ran his Ponzi fraud, misusing funds from at least 20 investors. He was a registered broker with LPL during that time.

Fackrell “used his position of trust to solicit victim investors and steer them away from legitimate investments to purported investments with” various “Robin Hood” named entities, according to the U.S. Attorney’s office. “These were entities [Mr.] Fackrell controlled and through which he could access the victim’s funds.”

Promising guaranteed annual returns of 5% to 7%, Mr. Fackrell “solicited his victim investors by making false and fraudulent representations, including that the investors’ money would be invested in, or secured by, gold and other precious metals,” according to the U.S. attorney. In fact, Mr. Fackrell spent only a fraction of investor money on such assets, the government claims, and diverted over $700,000 back to his investors in the fashion of a Ponzi scheme.

He used the balance of the money to cover personal expenditures, including hotel expenses, groceries and medical bills, and to make purchases at various retail shops and to make large cash withdrawals.

Information for this post was found at investmentnews.com.

Ameritas Broker Theft and Other Losses

If you have suffered losses, believe funds are missing from your account, or had funds stolen while with Ameritas Investment Corp., please call the Law Offices of Jeffrey Pederson at 1-866-817-0201 for a free consultation with an attorney.

We are currently investigating losses and missing funds of Ameritas investors due to inadequate supervision of Ameritas brokers.  Ameritas recently submitted an AWC, a settlement with regulators, in which the firm was censured and fined $50,000. Without admitting or denying the findings, the firm Stock handcuffsconsented to the sanctions and to the entry of findings that it failed to adequately monitor and otherwise supervise a registered representative’s activities. The findings stated that the firm did not detect that the representative changed a customer’s address of record to the address of the representative’s branch office, and then requested disbursements from the customer’s account to the new address of record. The customer did not authorize either the address change or the disbursement of funds. As a result, the firm sent funds from the customer’s account to the branch office, where the representative misappropriated the money. The firm’s supervisory systems and procedures at the time were not sufficient to adequately monitor its representative’s requests to change the customer’s address of record without her knowledge and to disburse funds to her new address.

Levi David Lindemann Ponzi Victims

Stock handcuffsAs reported in Investmentnews.com, Levi David Lindemann, a Minnesota-based investment adviser has received a six-plus-year prison sentence for stealing from clients and perpetuating a Ponzi scheme.

The 40-year-old adviser, Lindemann, was sentenced to 74 months in prison by a Minnesota federal court, after having pled guilty earlier this year to federal mail fraud and money-laundering charges.

Mr. Lindemann owned and operated Gershwin Financial Inc., which did business under the name Alternative Wealth Solutions, between 2009 and 2014.

“Lindemann abused his position of trust as a financial adviser to steal from his clients, including the elderly ” Mike Rothman, Minnesota’s commerce commissioner, said. “Lindemann defrauded his victims by promising to put their money in legitimate, safe investments when he actually used the funds to pay for personal expenses and Ponzi-type payments to other clients to cover up and continue his fraud.”

According to Mr. Lindemann’s guilty plea, he solicited funds from roughly 50 investors and said he would “use the invested funds to buy secured notes or other legitimate investment vehicles.”

If you are a victim of Lindemann or some other Ponzi scheme, please call 1-866-817-0201 to speak to a private attorney on a free and confidential basis to discuss your rights in private litigation.

Recovery for Jean Walsh-Josephson Losses

If you were an investor of Jean Walsh-Josephson, please call 1-866-877-0201 for a free consultation concerning potential recovery for your losses.

broker in handcuffsJean A. Walsh-Josephson was a financial advisor for Thrivent, formerly Thrivent Financial for Lutherans.  A Winnebago County judge has ordered a two-week trial for this former Oshkosh, Wisconsin financial adviser who accused of stealing $4 million from her mostly elderly investment clients.

The trial for Walsh-Josephson is set for Feb. 20 through March 3, 2017. Judge Thomas Gritton ordered the trial this week, days after victims and their families gathered in court May 13 for what they were led to believe would be a plea and sentencing hearing.

Walsh-Josephson faces 28 counts of theft in a business setting of more than $10,000 each after authorities say she stole more than one million dollars from at least seven clients in Winnebago and Outagamie counties. She also faces felony forgery misdemeanor theft and obstructing an officer charges after authorities say she stole $400 from a client while acting as a third-party intermediary in a property dispute.

If convicted on all charges, she could face a maximum sentence of 287 ½ years in prison.

The question for investors is the question of why Thrivent did not detect this level of theft.  All firms have a duty to take reasonable steps to detect and prevent broker theft.

Jeffrey Pederson has handled numerous cases concerning the theft and outside activity of brokers and have helped investors obtain favorable judgments and settlements.  Please call for a free consultation.