Tag Archives: unauthorized trading

Attention Investors of Michael Oromaner

If you have suffered losses investing with Michael  “Mike” Oromaner please call 1-866-817-0201 to speak to an attorney about your rights.  Oromaner has a long history of suits and regulatory actions concerning the unauthorized trading in the accounts of his investors.   If you have suffered losses you may be entitled to recovery from Oromaner’s former employers.

Regulatory rules provide that brokers may not exercise discretionary power in an investor’s account unless the investor has given prior written authorization and the account has been accepted by the member firm in writing as a discretionary account.

These rules also provide that a brokerage firm, in the conduct of his business, shall observe high standards of commercial honor and just and equitable principles of trade.  Oromaner exercised inappropriate discretion in the account of a single customer during a single year 41 times.

Respondent failed to obtain prior written authorization from this investor to exercise discretion in the account and employer did not approve the account for discretionary trading.

Because of this and other misdeeds, Oromaner is currently undergoing a two-year suspension from the securities industry.

Over the course of the career of Oromaner, he has been the subject of over 16 “disclosure events.”  A disclosure event is any lawsuit, bankruptcy, regulatory action, written investor complaint or other matter negatively reflecting on an advisor’s ability to handle the funds or recommend investments.  The 16 disclosure events of Oromaner is extremely high and raises the question of whether his employers were negligent in hiring him.

Please call if you wish to discuss potential recovery of your losses.

Investment Fraud of Marlon Cole, Legend

We are investigating the potential investment fraud actions of Marlon Cole of Legend Securities.  Please call 1-866-817-0201 for a free and confidential consultation with a private attorney specializing in the representation of investors.

Mr. Marlon Cole has also Spartan Capital, Fordham Financial, E.J. Sterling and Blackbook Capital.  He has recently been the subject of scrutiny by securities regulators.  He recently entered into a settlement agreement with FINRA, one of these regulators where Cole neither admitted nor denied the allegations against him.

The allegations against Cole are that from April 2013 through October 2014, while Cole was associated with Legend Securities, FINRA alleges that Cole engaged in excessive trading, unsuitable trading, and unauthorized trading. Specifically, Cole engaged in excessive trading in the investment accounts of six senior citizen investors that had trusted Cole as their broker.

One way to prove that an account was traded excessively is through the cost/equity ratio, the level of costs of an account per year as a percentage of the value of the account.  Turnover, the number of times the account was sold and purchased, also serves to measure illicit activity.  During the Relevant Period, Cole’s trading generated cost-to-equity ratios ranging from 29.82% to 589% and turnover rates ranging from 6.01 to 63.39. Such costs and turnover rates were inconsistent with the objectives of the senior investors, yet generated steady commissions for Cole.

Under FINRA Rule 2111, a registered representative must have a reasonable basis to believe, that a recommended securities transaction or investment strategy is suitable for a customer. Relevant to Cole’s trading here, the Rule prohibits excessive trading and trading that lacks a reasonable basis in light of a customer’s investment objectives and risk tolerance.

Rule 2111 also requires that where a representative controls an account, a series of recommended transactions, even if suitable by themselves, is not excessive and unsuitable for the customer when taken together in light of the customer’s investment profile.

When the costs in an account are so high that there can be no expectation of a reasonable return, no rational investor would knowingly agree to them.   That is what happened in the present matter.  The six customers here had investment objectives of growth and income or speculation. The sales charges for the six customers were in the form of both commissions and markups and mark-downs.  Both were excessive in light of the profiles.

This is not the first time Cole has been alleged to have engaged in securities fraud.  In 2011, Cole entered into a similar settlement with the Alabama Securities Commission.  That settlement centered on allegations that Cole “engaged in dishonest or unethical practices” including unauthorized trading in a customer account.

 

Losses with Larry Charles Wolfe

Jeffrey Pederson PC assists investors in recovering losses such as those incurred as the result of the misdeeds of brokers, such as the alleged misdeeds of Larry Charles Wolfe.  Currently with Stoever, Glass & Co., Wolfe was previously with Aegis Capital Corp., and Herbert J. Sims & Co. Those suffering losses with this broker are likely entitled to recovery from either Wolfe or his employer.  Call 1-866-817-0201 for a free and confidential consultation.

Invest photo 2FINRA has announced that it has entered into a settlement with Larry Charles Wolfe for making unauthorized transactions in his clients’ accounts.  The allegations are that between November 10, 2015 and November 16,2015, Wolfe inappropriately exercised discretion in the accounts of 39 investors without obtaining prior written authorization from the customers or written approval of the accounts as discretionary from his employing member firm, in violation of numerous state and federal securities laws.

A securities broker must obtain authorization from an investor prior to making a securities transaction in the investor’s account unless that broker has written authorization to make such a trade.

Additionally, MSRB Rule G-17 and FINRA rules require that each broker or dealer in municipal securities to deal fairly with customers and prohibits registered representatives from engaging “in any deceptive, dishonest, or unfair practice.”

The trades are believed to involve municipal bonds and other securities.

In addition to this regulatory action, Wolfe has been sued by investors at least ten (10) times, primarily for allegations of unauthorized, excessive, or unsuitable trades.  Additionally, at least two (2) other investors have threatened suit.  Despite Mr. Wolfe being accused of wide-scale fraud he has not yet lost his license and is still working in the securities industry.

 

Investigation – K.C. Ward, Craig David Dima

FINRA barred former K.C. Ward Financial registered representative Craig David Dima
for making unauthorized and unsuitable trades totaling approximately $15 million in a
73-year-old retiree’s account, and for misrepresenting the reasons for the trades to the
customer.  This was announced in FINRA’s May Disciplinary Report.

NYSE pic 1Susan Schroeder, FINRA Acting Head of Enforcement, said, “There is no place in this industry
for brokers who take advantage of elderly customers. Protecting senior investors from
predatory behavior such as unsuitable and unauthorized trading is part of our core mission
and will always be a priority for FINRA.”

FINRA found that on 11 occasions, Dima sold virtually all of the customer’s Colgate-
Palmolive stock, accumulated over 28 years of employment at the company, without the
customer’s permission. In fact, Dima sold the customer’s shares even after the customer
told Dima not to sell the stock, which she considered a valuable long-term investment
and reliable source of dividends.

When confronted by the customer about the sales, Dima misrepresented to her that they were caused by a “computer glitch” or a technical error. In connection with Dima’s unauthorized sales and subsequent repurchases of Colgate stock, Dima charged the customer more than $375,000 in mark-ups, mark-downs and fees and deprived the customer of substantial dividends had she held the Colgate shares as intended.

FINRA also found that Dima’s trading of the customer’s Colgate shares was unsuitable and
violated FINRA rules prohibiting excessive mark-ups and mark-downs.

Attention Investors of Voigt Cullen Kempson III

Pederson, PC is investigating the actions of V. Cullen Kempson III currently of American Portfolios and previously of Commonwealth Financial Network.   Kempson has previously settled charges of unauthorized trading in the account of a deceased investor and is currently facing felony weapons charges.  To speak to an attorney for a free and confidential consultation please call 1-866-817-0201.  

A recent settlement agreement Kempson enter into with FINRA regulators agrees to the 30-day suspension for making a large number of unauthorized trades in the account of an investor Kempson knew was deceased.  In the agreement, referred to as an AWC, Kempson neither admits nor denies fault.

The alleged facts are that in February 2007, A Kempson investor opened two investment Invest photo 2advisory accounts with Kempson at the Firm. At the time, the investor signed an agreement with the Firm granting Kempson discretionary trading authority, the ability to make securities trades without first contacting the investor.  A broker must contact an investor prior to the making of trades unless the broker has been granted authority by the investor in writing to make trades in an account.

On June 13, 2015, the investor passed away. Although Kempson was aware of the investor’s death since at least June 29,2015, Kempson did not inform his Firm of the investor’s death and continued to effect trades on a discretionary basis in the accounts.

Between June 29,2015 and April 5, 2016, Kempson effected a total of 40 trades in the deceased individual’s accounts.  FINRA Rule 2010 requires members to observe high standards of commercial honor and just and equitable principles of trade. After the investor passed away, Kempson had no written authority to conduct any trades in the investor’s accounts. FINRA charged that, by effecting 40 trades in a deceased customer’s accounts, Kempson violated FINRA Rule 2010.

Additionally, in February 2017, Kempson was charged on felony weapons charges for the unlawful possession of a weapon.  As stated in his CRD, he case is in front of the New Jersey Superior Court in Essex Vincinage.  He has asserted that he is not guilty.

Losses with Matthew David Niederbaumer

Please call if you suffered losses with Matthew David Niederbaumer of Huron, South Dakota and employed by Thrivent Investment Management.

Mr. Niederbaumer submitted an AWC, a settlement agreement where a securities broker neither admits but cannot deny fault, in which he was fined $5,000 and suspended from association with any FINRA member in any capacity for 10 business days.

Without admitting or denying the findings, Niederbaumer consented to the sanctions and to the entry of findings that he exercised discretion in executing transactions in connection with the sale and purchase of exchange-traded notes and funds in five of his customer’s accounts. The findings stated that while the customers consented to the transactions, Niederbaumer did not obtain the customers’ prior written authorization to exercise discretion in the accounts, and his member firm did not approve the accounts for discretionary trading.

Part of the concern in this matter is the fact that the trades involved exchange traded notes (ETN).  ETN investments carry a high commission and are high risk.  The possibility for abuse and improper intent is much more likely when such trades result in a commission higher than normal, and the chance that a customer would reject a recommended investment with such a high commission if consulted is greater.

The record of Mr. Niederbaumer’s compiled by FINRA can be found at the following link.

Dougherty & Company Investment Losses

 

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) announced in January 2017 that it resolved a regulatory action against Dougherty & Company LLC, headquartered in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  We believe that this action exposed supervisory problems within Dougherty and may entitle investors of certain investments recovery for investment losses.  Please call 1-866-817-0201 for a free consultation with an attorney

Dougherty entered into a settlement agreement with FINRA regulators, where Dougherty did not did not admit or deny fault, but agreed to a censure, a fine of $140,000, and required to pay $78,910 in restitution to a customer.  The action stems from the allegation that for more than four years, Dougherty did not adequately supervise a securities broker who initiated hundreds of trades for elderly customers without contacting them, thus lacking appropriate authorization, and unsuitably recommended dozens of transactions to those customers. Unsuitable recommendations are investment recommendations that were of higher risk than the investor agreed to assume.

The settlement agreement contained certain findings of fact, and those findings stated that Dougherty assigned the primary responsibility for supervising broker trading activity to a supervisor who was also responsible for supervising numerous other brokers and handling his own customers’ accounts. The supervisor’s supervision of the broker in question was not subject to adequate firm oversight or specific direction. Instead, Dougherty inappropriately relied on the supervisor’s discretion and judgment, which the supervisor did not exercise appropriately.

The findings also stated that the firm did not have supervisory tools that were reasonably designed to detect financial adviser or broker misconduct.  FINRA stated that while the supervisor received daily trade blotters and certain monthly exception reports, data generated by a brokerage firm that identifies the investments recommended by a broker and warns of potentially inappropriate investment recommendations, the firm did not provide exception reports addressing short-term trading or margin usage by the financial adviser to the supervisor.

Additionally, the firm’s exception reports designed to identify inappropriate recommendations to elderly customers excluded accounts in the name of a trust, regardless of the age of the settlor or trustee.  Such shortcomings are important because the broker’s trading activity in two of the accounts at issue did not appear on those exception reports because of the existence of a trust.

The findings also included that the firm failed to respond appropriately to warning signs about the broker’s business, such as a dramatic increase in his commissions without a commensurate change in the number of accounts that he handled or the type of products that he sold. In sum, the firm’s system of supervision was not reasonably designed under the circumstances to prevent violations of securities laws and rules, including rules governing trading without customers’ approval and unsuitable recommendations.

The full AWC can be found at the following link.

Jeffrey Pederson PC is a private law firm that has helped hundreds of investors successfully recover similar losses.