Tag Archives: investment

Charles Fackrell Fraud

If you were an investor with Charles Fackrell and believe you may be a victim of his fraud, or simply wish to know your rights, please call 1-866-817-0201 for a free consultation with an attorney.

LPLFackrell,  a former LPL adviser based in North Carolina, was sentenced by a federal court to more than five-years in prison for running a $1.4 million Ponzi scheme that operated under the name “Robin Hood.”

The former adviser pleaded guilty to one count of securities fraud in April and was sentenced last week to 63 months in jail.

From May 2012 to December 2014, Fackrell ran his Ponzi fraud, misusing funds from at least 20 investors. He was a registered broker with LPL during that time.

Fackrell “used his position of trust to solicit victim investors and steer them away from legitimate investments to purported investments with” various “Robin Hood” named entities, according to the U.S. Attorney’s office. “These were entities [Mr.] Fackrell controlled and through which he could access the victim’s funds.”

Promising guaranteed annual returns of 5% to 7%, Mr. Fackrell “solicited his victim investors by making false and fraudulent representations, including that the investors’ money would be invested in, or secured by, gold and other precious metals,” according to the U.S. attorney. In fact, Mr. Fackrell spent only a fraction of investor money on such assets, the government claims, and diverted over $700,000 back to his investors in the fashion of a Ponzi scheme.

He used the balance of the money to cover personal expenditures, including hotel expenses, groceries and medical bills, and to make purchases at various retail shops and to make large cash withdrawals.

Information for this post was found at investmentnews.com.

Paul Lebel of LPL

Paul Lebel, a broker formerly registered with LPL Financial, was barred on Tuesday, October 18, 2016, by the Securities and Exchange Commission for churning and excessively trading mutual funds in customer accounts and generating excess fees.  If you suffered losses with Mr. Lebel please call 1-866-817-0201 to speak to an attorney and receive a free consultation.

Mutual funds carry large loads which can be costly to investors if trading in and out of the funds.  These same loads can lead to substantial fees for a broker.  Brokers can defraud investors with only a few mutual fund trades.

Invest photo 2Lebel, who was with LPL broker from 2008 to 2014, “during his employment with LPL, [Lebel] defrauded four customers by churning several of their accounts,” according to the SEC which entered into a settlement with Mr. Lebel. “In particular, Lebel exercised de facto control over these customers’ accounts and excessively traded mutual fund shares which carry large front-end load fees.”

Mr. Lebel bought and sold mutual fund A shares, which are meant to be long-term, buy-and-hold investments, generating $50,000 in commissions, according to the SEC. Mr. Lebel will pay $56,500 as part of the settlement.

The SEC stated, “Lebel’s excessive trading was inconsistent with the customers’ investmentLPL objectives, and willfully disregarded the customers’ interest,”

We suspect that there are other investors who who have suffered loss as the result of fraud by Mr. Lebel.  We have help many investors recover their losses due to such action.  The amounts that we are seeking are separate and possibly in addition to the recovery by the SEC.

Churchville Ponzi Scheme, Investment Fraud

If you were a victim of the Ponzi scheme or other investment fraud of Rhode Island investment adviser Patrick Churchville please call 1-866-817-0201.

Churchville has agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges for orchestrating a $21 million Ponzi scheme, according to a statement from the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

Stock handcuffsAside from that scheme, Churchville, 47, also committed investment fraud when he used $2.5 million of investor funds to help purchase his home and failed to pay more than $820,000 in personal federal income taxes, according to the statement.

Churchville, the owner and president of ClearPath Wealth Management, will plead guilty to five counts of wire fraud and one count of tax fraud.

Churchville is also a party in a civil case brought by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) in May 2015.

Between 2008 and 2011, Mr. Churchville invested approximately $18 million of client money in JER Receivables, although by June 2010 he had become aware that ClearPath had been defrauded by that company, according to the statement.

Instead of notifying his clients of the losses, Churchville,  paid them with money obtained from new investors, misappropriating around $21 million of investor funds in the process, the statement alleges. To help carry out his scheme, he told investors JER Receivables was producing high rates of return, according to the statement.

Aequitas

If you have suffered losses with Aequitas please call 1-866-817-0201 to speak to a lawyer for a free consultation.

The sudden and stunning collapse of Aequitas Capital Management continues to unfold. The alternative investment’s platform is under investigation by both the SEC and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Nearly $600 million was bet on a diverse array of subprime lending strategies.

This bet was done with the funds of the Aequitas investors.  It’s unclear how much, if anything, they’ll recover.

Complicit in this matter are the financial advisors recommending this investment.  The investment was reliant upon such financial advisors for funding the investment.  It appears that the due diligence in the investment by some financial advisors, required to be completed by financial advisors, was substantially insufficient.   The financials of Aequitas evidence existing and ongoing financial weakness.

Aequitas suffered a debilitating cash shortage that has forced it to terminate 80 of its 125 workers. It has defaulted on payments due to investors. It has confirmed in letters to customers it is considering bankruptcy filings.

The SEC and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau have launched separate investigations of the company. Brian Rice and Scott Gillis, two of the company’s six senior partners, resigned in recent weeks. The company’s general counsel just quit. As did Gillis, the CFO.  Gillis was the second Aequitas chief financial officer to depart in less than a year.

Oil or Gas Investment Losses

Oil Stock IIJeffrey Pederson, P.C. helps investors determine if they have a right to recover investment losses in oil, gas or other investments.  Please call 1-866-817-0201 toll-free for a free and confidential consultation.

While brokers will unlikely blame the 2020 decline in energy investments on the coronavirus issues, the declines started in advance of the virus and the virus was only a small portion of the decline.

These investments have always been known to be speculative with a potential for large losses.  Heightened commissions or an inattention to risk drove brokers or adviser’s to inappropriately recommend such investments over the past few years.  The losses such investments suffered in 2020 is not first time oil and gas has gone into free-fall.  In fact, the oil and gas industry has suffered equal or greater shocks in the past decade.

In 2016, oil dropped to a price below $30 a barrel.  This happened again in 2020 when some oil futures fell below $0.  Many investors simply ignore their losses, believing that the loss is simply due to the market, without knowing that they may be entitled to a recovery.  Such individuals unnecessarily let their plans for retirement or other future plans go unfulfilled because of the financial loss they sustained.

In late 2014, countless oil, gas and other energy companies have filed for bankruptcy.  Many investors in these companies were illegally sold these investments by brokerage firms motivated by commissions paid by the investments.  Such investments can take many forms including, but not limited to, Master Limited Partnerships (MLPs), common stock, notes, bonds, mutual funds, and Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs).

Regulators have put brokers on notice that oil and gas exchange traded products, ETPs, should not be recommended to average investors.

In sum, these investments are and have always been inappropriately sold to investors looking for moderate investments or otherwise looking to fund retirement or retirement savings.  The investments are and have never been stable.  This was known or should have been known by brokers and investment advisors for years.  Recommendations of oil and gas investments to such moderate investors is motivated either by heightened commissions many of these investments pay or, in some cases, negligence.

The reason brokers continue to misrepresent these investments and recommend to people who do not want such risk is the commission paid.   These investments can pay a broker and brokerage 10 to 20 times the commission that the average stock transaction pays.

Investors in certain ETFs, such as Direxion or USO, may have been inappropriately invested in these historically speculative investments.  Please call to speak to an attorney about whether you are entitled to recovery.

We are also currently investigating investments into the following energy companies:Oil Stock

American Eagle, BPZ, Buccaneer, Clean Energy Fuels, Climax Energy, Duer Wagner, Earthstone, Ensign Energy Services, Exxon, Fiduciary Claymore, Genal Energy, Hart Resources, Hercules Offshore,  Matador, Milagro Oil and Gas, Noble Energy, Petrobras, Origin Energy, Quicksilver Resources, Sabine, Samson Resources, Sandridge Energy, SBM Offshore, Southern Pacific, Walter Energy and WBH Energy.

Additionally, we are looking at MLPs focusing on energy such as Goldman Sachs MLP (GMZ) or any of the Steelpath investments.

Oil and gas limited partnership losses can do more than take away the hard earned principal of investors, it can also create tax liabilities that the investor was not expecting.  The result is that the investor could lose more than invested.  The following link discusses the risks that in more detail.

Jeffrey Pederson has represented investors in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut , Florida, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming, in FINRA arbitration actions against securities brokerage firms for unsuitable investments.  Please call for a confidential and free consultation.